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By Andrzej Wiercinski (ed.)

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113 There is nonetheless a kind of Ariadne’s thread running through it all, an underlying continuity in terms of both method and motivation. Methodologically speaking, Ricoeur’s basic concern, like that of other phenomenologists, has always been the reflexive-transcendental one of bringing our lived experience to the proper expression of its own meaning. ”114 Ricoeur’s philosophical motivation in this regard is his fundamental belief that our existence is indeed meaningful, and thus expressible (dicible) -- this belief in the expressibility or “sayability” (dicibilité) of experience corresponding to Gadamer’s thesis as to the linguality or “speakability” of the world (die Sprachlichkeit der Welt).

114 Ricoeur’s philosophical motivation in this regard is his fundamental belief that our existence is indeed meaningful, and thus expressible (dicible) -- this belief in the expressibility or “sayability” (dicibilité) of experience corresponding to Gadamer’s thesis as to the linguality or “speakability” of the world (die Sprachlichkeit der Welt). “There is no human experience that is not structured by language” (BSS, 680), Ricoeur maintains, echoing as it were Merleau-Ponty. : Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 2002).

107 Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Sense and Non-Sense, trans. Hubert L. : Northwestern University Press, 1964), 93, hereafter SNS. : Greenwood Press, 1986), chap. , Between Suspicion and Sympathy. 109 Ricoeur, Husserl, 221. , Between Suspicion and Sympathy. 113 There is nonetheless a kind of Ariadne’s thread running through it all, an underlying continuity in terms of both method and motivation. Methodologically speaking, Ricoeur’s basic concern, like that of other phenomenologists, has always been the reflexive-transcendental one of bringing our lived experience to the proper expression of its own meaning.

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