Download Goal: To Double the Rate of Hispanics Earning a Bachelor's by Geroges Vernez PDF

By Geroges Vernez

The extent of schooling Hispanics in attaining will principally be certain no matter if their position is commensurate with their demographic significance and whether or not they partake within the complete advantages of residing within the U.S.

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Extra info for Goal: To Double the Rate of Hispanics Earning a Bachelor's Degree

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Krop, and C. P. Rydell, Closing the Education Gap: Benefits and Costs, Santa Monica, CA: RAND, MR-1036-EDU, 1999. 4 G. S. Workforce: Who Struggles? Who Succeeds? New York, NY: Lexington Books, 1999. 5 G. Vernez and A. S. Education, Santa Monica, CA: RAND, MR-718-AMF, 1996. 6 G. Vernez, Education’s Hispanic Challenge, The Jerome Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Working Paper No. 228, 1998. 7 J. Durand and D. S. Massey, “The Changing Geography of Mexican Immigration to the United States: 1910–1996,” Social Science Quarterly, 81(1): 1–15, 2000.

The increased enrollment required to meet the goal would not be distributed evenly throughout the nation’s high schools and colleges. In California, which will educate 40 percent of the nation’s Hispanics, meeting the goal would mean increases in enrollment of 4 percent in K to 12 (mostly in high schools), 18 percent in lower-division colleges (including community colleges), and 22 percent in upper-division colleges. Again, these increases are in addition to the approximately 30 percent increase needed to meet the increase in the size of the college-age population at current college-going rates.

Population. Early reports from the 2000 Census of population suggest that these projections are conservative, most particularly as the growth in the Hispanic population is concerned. For a full description of the RAND Education Simulation model, see G. Vernez, R. A. Krop, and C. P. Rydell, Closing the Education Gap: Benefits and Costs, Santa Monica, CA: RAND, MR-1036-EDU, 1999. 4 G. S. Workforce: Who Struggles? Who Succeeds? New York, NY: Lexington Books, 1999. 5 G. Vernez and A. S. Education, Santa Monica, CA: RAND, MR-718-AMF, 1996.

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